Teaching Religion to Children: Book on Christianity

Keep The Faith by Mike Berenstain

When it comes to teaching religion to your kids, it is often difficult to find adequate teaching material. As a Christian parent, you only want what is best for your kids.¬†Christianity books for children¬†are often filled with many questionable ideas that a parent might suspect are not wholesome. Unfortunately, some authors of many such books either do not hold to your understanding of doctrine, or may not appear to be teaching Christianity at all. At least, not the Christianity you grew up with. For this reason, it is important for today’s Christian parent to develop a watchful eye. Many religious books claiming to be Christian in origin actively introduce ideas that arise from pagan traditions and origins. This is something you may not want creeping into your Christian home and influencing your children.

 

God Gave Us Easter by Lisa Tawn Bergren
God Gave Us Easter by Lisa Tawn Bergren

 

Hugs & Kisses, God by Allia Zobel Nolan
Hugs & Kisses, God by Allia Zobel Nolan

 

Keep The Faith by Mike Berenstain
Keep The Faith by Mike Berenstain

 

 

The Easter Story by Patricia A
The Easter Story by Patricia A

 

On the other hand, trying to filter out all the questionable ideas for your children does not always help to ensure that their own mind’s ability to discern truth from error is developing properly. Sometimes, it is best to determine which ideas that are not wholesome are age appropriate for them to have open discussions with you. This way, you can begin to expose your children to the reality that not everything being taught in some of these books is good for them, as well as helping them to navigate and identify the reasons why this is the case. By encouraging your kids to openly talk about such things with you, this helps to develop the good habit of getting your kids to come to you when a particular idea or teaching is bothering them. This is a sign of Christian maturity that a lot of parents fail to recognize is going on inside their children. This is not the time to tell your child what they should or should not believe. If you are always telling them what to believe, it will typically lead them to depend on you to do their thinking for them. Children who depend on others to think things out for them are usually not prepared to weather the storm in times when their faith is truly being tested and no one is around to tell them what to think.

Of course, this begs the question, “How do you teach religion to your kids?” One way is to refuse to allow your kids to be lazy thinkers. In this capacity, those books with questionable ideas become material for challenging your kids to think. Instead of dominating the discussion, it is perhaps best to raise issues and question the child in a way that helps them to see that you are interested in how they reason things out–especially when it comes to questionable ideas found in some of these books floating around in Christianity. In the process of doing this, this not only teaches the child religion in an intelligent fashion, it also gives the parent a chance to improve their own capacity to think. Because, it won’t be long before your child will bring up questions and ideas that will challenge your own understanding of things. When you provide a child with the right environment to learn, it is much easier for them to learn how to think on their feet. Shop for Christianity Books @ NoQStore